Forum Question: How to undo a terminal command

I was playing around and a came across a terminal command to put the widget on the desktop. After I put the widget back into dashboard it messed up the widget. The widget is visible when dashboard is launched, but it is inoperable. How can I undo the terminal command so that everything goes back to normal. I don’t care that the ability to put a widget on the desktop goes away. I would actually prefer that for some reason.

Here is what I did.

“This allows you to drag widgets out of Dashboard onto the desktop. Requires the dock to be relaunched to take effect, so type “killall Dock” and press enter. Now, if you click and hold onto a widget in the dashboard and press F12 to return to the desktop, the widget won’t disappear with the rest.
defaults write com.apple.dashboard devmode YES”
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matt

Comments: 5 Responses to “How to undo a terminal command”

    11/2/10 @ 8:00 pm

    Well, you can’t “undo” a terminal command. But you can switch it back. Just use “NO” instead of “YES” in the same command to set that setting back to the way it was. Then you may need to restart or use another terminal command to relaunch the dock.
    If you just want to get rid of that widget floating around, then a restart (or logout and then login) may be all you need.

    Shelley
    12/25/10 @ 9:03 am

    Hi there, can you help? I just accidentally deleted an entire text message history with a really good friend of mine by accidentally making pressing something ie delete came up on his message and me trying to undo that deleted a year of messages! Happy Christmas x

      12/25/10 @ 9:52 am

      On you Mac? Using a Terminal command? I’m not sure what you mean. Maybe you mean on your iPhone? I don’t think there is a way to get back messages you have deleted.

    MQ
    7/4/12 @ 5:37 pm

    Hi- if I put in terminal commands

    sudo ipfw add 0 deny tcp from any to any 1935
    sudo ipfw add 0 deny udp from any to any 1935

    How do I negate them?

      7/5/12 @ 12:16 am

      Not sure what these do (some sort of Firewall modification?) but you have to learn the command that does the opposite, or erases the change. I’d go back to where you learned about this command and see if they say there — if not I’d contact the person or site that suggested the command. Changes are it is as simple as “allow” instead of “deny” but I can’t be sure.

Comments Closed.